3 Ukrainian software developers founded Grammarly in 2009. Their goal remains to help people communicate more effectively. And the Grammarly content strategy is worth looking at to see how far they’ve come.

Since its launch, the AI-powered freemium writing tool has grown into a globally recognized brand. 

As of 2021, there were 30 million daily active users and 30,000 Grammarly Business accounts. And these numbers are almost certainly higher as of today. 

grammarly growth timeline.
Source: Grammarly About Us Page

But how did they get here?

For one, their content strategy drives 33 million visitors to their site a month. 

And as we’ll quickly cover in this article, some of the ways they do this are things businesses of all kinds should absolutely take notes on. 

Who do they target?

Grammarly is currently an English-only writing tool. As a result, their site targets relevant keywords in countries that perfectly match their target customer. 

These are major markets where English and the need for strong English writing are commonplace. 

I.e. USA, India, Philippines, UK. 

Grammarly Traffic Numbers.
Source: Semrush

The Kinds of Content & Keywords Grammarly Ranks for

Based on estimates from Semrush’s Keywords by Intent feature, 85.5% or 334,000 of Grammarly’s ranked keywords show informational intent.

Grammarly keyword types.
Source: Semrush

These are keywords related to:

Basically, terms people search for when they want answers to the kinds of questions that Grammarly was built to solve. 

And since they target informational intent, close to 65% of their traffic is non-branded.

People are simply looking for help, and Grammarly is there, ready and willing to oblige.

Some of their top pages, according to Ahrefs, highlight this. Many are grammar or spelling related and drive at least 100,000 in estimated traffic to the site (which in reality is probably much higher).



Grammarly Top Pages in Ahrefs.
Source: Ahrefs

What are some of the advantages of this content strategy for their business?

This emphasis on informational intent content is a win-win for Grammarly. 

Non-branded info content is more likely to generate high-quality links.

And in the case of Grammarly, it frequently and naturally gets links from high-authority sites like Wikipedia, NYTs, etc.

Grammarly Links examples.
Source: Ahrefs

These links compound and help boost Grammarly’s site overall authority (which is now a DR 89) so that they can go after pretty much any keyword they want. 

And as long as the page matches the search intent, it’ll rank in the top position.

These pages answer the query, and trigger a popup to convert visitors. 

These popups ‘soft sell’ visitors to sign up for free with an enticing message, CTA, and social proof. Like the example below, which includes a quote about the tool from Forbes. 

Grammarly Popup.
Source Grammarly

Once visitors sign up from this simple process, they’re in the sales funnel. 

And as they use Grammarly, they don’t need to search for similar terms because they’ll see that Grammarly takes care of it for them. 

And surely anyone who has used the free tool knows how helpful it is. This experience makes users more willing to become paying customers at some point in the future. 

This is especially true for businesses when you take into account their excellent plagiarism checker. Plus, whatever other features the company may add to the paid model in the future. 

And with Grammarly’s current valuation at $13 billion, their process seems to be working.

Congratulations to Grammarly for a content strategy done right

When you add this content strategy to their paid advertising efforts – PPC, video ads – it’s no surprise Grammarly has reached such success.

They’ve not only built a great tool, but their marketing team has ensured it gets in front of and used by the right people. 

And if that’s not the goal of every business (while making money, of course), then I don’t know what is. 

www.nichepursuits.com